California: Freaky and Fabulous

California has more people than all of Canada. It’s one of the biggest economies in the world. It’s home to Silicon Valley and Hollywood, centres that have been driving innovation and popular culture all over the world. It’s also a non-stop freak show for a couple of slow-travelling cyclists.

Out of business.
Out of business.

We had all kinds of strange encounters with people along the way, some of them positive and others not so much. I know I’m generalizing but northern California strikes me as a bit of an isolated, conservative, slightly paranoid place, fiercely protective of its way of life. Is it really necessary to post a “private property” sign on your front door? Please, don’t answer that.

Somewhere in Humboldt County, while standing in a pull-out along the road chatting with a couple of other cyclists, an old school bus painted in the red, white and blue of the US flag, came grinding up the narrow highway. A bunch of people sitting in the front of the bus beside the driver looked at us and gave us the finger. This happened a few times.

Humboldt Junkies in Redcrest.
Humboldt Junkies in Redcrest.

Homeless people wandering the highway, talking to themselves or a lamp post, obviously in need of help but perhaps not interested or unable to get it. In Eureka, on a street just outside the town’s centre, a group of about 100 rough-looking men sitting and standing on the sidewalks on both sides of the street, many of them with fierce looking dogs.

And then there was the guy who roared up beside me while we were taking a break on the side of the road to have a snack. He was shouting something but I didn’t understand what he wanted, something about picking up a cigarette. His passenger window was rolled down only a little and he again shouted at me: “Hey buddy, can you pick up that cigarette. Open the door and pick up that cigarette.”

I cautiously opened the door and he asked me again to “pick up that cigarette.” On the passenger-side floor there were two cigarettes. They had fallen off the seat and he was unable to reach down because he was so huge, his giant body wedged between the seat and the steering wheel of the large Volvo SUV. I’m not sure how he had gotten in, never mind how he was going to get out. Maybe he won’t. I picked up the cigarettes and put them on the passenger seat for him and he yelled: “OK. Close the door. I gotta go.” I had barely let go of the door handle as he peeled out, leaving me standing in the dust.

Anchor Bay, CA.
Anchor Bay, CA.

In Anchor Bay we met a fit-looking, 30-something guy in front of a store who asked about our journey. He was genuinely interested and thought it was cool we were travelling on bicycles. He said he lived in the area and did a bit of farming and a bit of surfing. He warned us to be careful on the road because it’s narrow and mostly without a shoulder. Not far from there, Christoph and I were both run off the road by a cement truck. It came within a few inches of me and I bailed into the ditch. I looked behind me and saw Christoph also in the ditch. We were both shaken up a bit by that close encounter and pulled into a park at the top of the hill where we took a break, had lunch and tried to calm down after that close call.

These are just some of the impressions that stuck. Others are cycling through the northern redwood forests in awe of the giant trees, but at the same time feeling sadness there are only so few left.

The northern Redwoods in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.
The northern Redwoods in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

The beautiful central plaza of Arcata.

Arcata's central plaza is reminiscent of South American towns.
Arcata’s central plaza is reminiscent of South American towns.

Or the burger and beers we had in a tiny tavern in the equally tiny town of Klamath.

Christoph rehydrates at The Country Club in Klamath, CA.
Christoph rehydrates at The Country Club in Klamath, CA.

Or screaming down the mountain for 20 kilometres on the Shoreline Highway, west of Leggett, on our way back to the coast.

Descending Leggett Hill (video frame grab)
Descending Leggett Hill (video frame grab)

And camping with other cyclists, swapping stories from the road.

Camped again with Rod, Kendra and SaraMae at the Pinewood campground in MacKerricker State Park outside Ft. Bragg, CA.
Camped again with Rod, Kendra and SaraMae at the Pinewood campground in MacKerricker State Park outside Ft. Bragg, CA.

And the beautiful beaches along the Shoreline Highway.

The beach at Elk, CA.
The beach at Elk, CA.

The superb breakfast we had at a roadside café in Jenner, and Fort Bragg, and San Geronimo and…

We had a second breakfast at Cafe Aquatica in Jenner, CA.
We had a second breakfast at Cafe Aquatica in Jenner, CA.
Rod and Christoph at Cafe 1, our breakfast stop in Ft. Bragg, CA.
Rod and Christoph at Cafe 1, our breakfast stop in Ft. Bragg, CA.
Behold: Bacon. Breakfast at the Two Bird Cafe in San Geronimo.
Behold: Bacon. Breakfast at the Two Bird Cafe in San Geronimo.

And finally, cycling into San Fransisco across the Golden Gate Bridge, arguably one of the most dangerous stretches of road I’ve ever ridden as we dodged hordes of pedestrians, and tourists on rented bicycles holding selfie-sticks to record their wobbly ride along that narrow two-way path. For some inexplicable reason, only one path is open for pedestrians and cyclists, alternating at different times of day with the path on the other side.

Crossing the Golden Gate Bridge into San Fransisco.
Crossing the Golden Gate Bridge into San Fransisco (video frame grab)

And so, after 25 days and 2,079 kilometres of cycling from Vancouver, we arrived in San Fransisco. We had taken only one day off along the way but now had a couple of days to relax and stroll around San Fransisco before I would fly home and Christoph would carry on south to San Diego.

The end of our tour together. 2,000 kilometres in 25 days.
The end of our tour together.

It was a great tour with a great friend. Christoph, thanks for the ride. It was totally “asshole.” 🙂

Christoph heads out for the rest of his tour from San Fransisco to San Diego.
Christoph heads out for the rest of his tour from San Fransisco to San Diego.

Here is a map of our journey through northern California. Click on it and it will open a new page where you can dissect all the data, if you wish to do so.

California route map
California route map

Here are some more photos from the final section of our tour.

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5 thoughts on “California: Freaky and Fabulous

  1. What an a… awesome post! Thank you for writing down these memories. I am so glad you took care about the log book in terms of dates and locations. All those towns, all those beaches… It’s been almost too much breath taking impressions for 4 weeks.
    Beautiful pictures as always, dude!

    Cheers,
    buddy

  2. Thanks, Paul: nice memories of my old stomping grounds at my alma mater, Humboltd State at Arcata. As a dual citizen with a last USA address at Arcata, I get to vote for city council and always pick the ones on the ballots with names like Serenity, Sunshine and Meadowchild.

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